Dental Veneers

Veneers

Fast, easy veneers can make a remarkable difference in your smile.

 

A Dazzling New Smile Is Waiting For You

If you’re unhappy with the shape, color, or spacing of your teeth, our dentists can combine their skill and artistry to bring about a dramatic change, usually in just two office visits.

Veneers are very thin, translucent facings that are applied to your front teeth and look completely natural, though they’re made of very durable porcelain. Your veneers will be perfectly matched, in shape and color, to your ideal of a dazzling new smile—one that will last for years.

Getting veneers is fast and painless. The first step is to meet with your dentist, who will consider a host of factors— face shape, bite, oral health, coloring, and more. He or she will listen to your goals and answer all your questions. To prepare your teeth to receive the veneers, they usually are lightly buffed and an impression is taken. From that, your veneers will be carefully custom-crafted. On your final visit, your teeth will be thoroughly cleaned and your veneers will be permanently bonded in place.

A smile is so important, there’s no reason to wait to improve it. To make it easy to afford porcelain veneers, we offer flexible payment options. We also accept most major insurance plans.

FAQs

What to do in a dental emergency

People risk breaking their teeth or otherwise injuring their mouths while eating, playing, exercising, and participating in other seemingly harmless activities. It’s important to understand what to do in case of a dental emergency so that your tooth can be repaired when you are able to see a dentist.

What is tooth decay and what causes it?

Tooth decay, also known as caries or cavities, is an oral disease that affects many people. Unlike other diseases, however, caries is not life-threatening and is highly preventable, though it affects most people to some degree during their lifetime.

Natural bacteria live in your mouth and form plaque. The plaque interacts with deposits left on your teeth from sugary and starchy foods and produces acids. These acids damage tooth enamel over time by dissolving, or demineralizing enamel, which weakens the teeth and leads to tooth decay.

Foods containing carbohydrates (starches and sugars), such as soda pop, candy, ice cream, milk, and cake, and even some fruits, vegetables, and juices, may contribute to tooth decay.

What can be done for ulcers or canker sores in the mouth?

Common causes of canker sores

  • Local trauma and stress
  • Diet and food allergies
  • Hormonal changes
  • Use of certain medications

Common treatments of canker sores:

  • Antimicrobial mouthwashes
  • Local painkillers
  • Over-the-counter remedies (oral adhesive patches, liquids and gels)

How to improve your oral health

Many people ring in a new year by making health-related resolutions to improve their lives, but how many of those lifestyle changes are kept past January? The Academy of General Dentistry (AGD), a professional association of more than 35,000 general dentists dedicated to staying up to date in the profession through continuing education, has compiled some easy-to-keep oral health tips that consumers can work into their everyday routines and continue to perform throughout the year.

“Oral health means more than just an attractive smile,” says AGD spokesperson Raymond Martin, DDS, MAGD. “Poor oral health and untreated oral diseases and conditions can have a significant impact on quality of life. And, in many cases, the condition of the mouth mirrors the condition of the body as a whole.”

Tips:

  • Floss every day. It’s the single most important factor in preventing gum disease, which affects more than 50 percent of adults. Spend two to three minutes flossing at least once a day. Not flossing because it irritates your gums? The more often you floss, the tougher your gums will become.
  • Brush your teeth for at least two to three minutes twice daily. If you’re not sure whether you’re brushing long enough, simply brush for the length of an entire song on the radio.
  • Change your toothbrush or toothbrush head (if you’re using an electric toothbrush) before the bristles become splayed and frayed, or every three to four months. Not only are old toothbrushes ineffective, they may harbor harmful bacteria that can cause infections, such as gingivitis and gum disease.
  • Drink sugary beverages through a straw. This will minimize the amount of time that the sugars are in contact with your teeth, which can minimize the risk of developing cavities.
  • Replace carbonated beverages, which cause enamel erosion and cavities, with water, milk, tea, or coffee.
  • Chew sugarless gum that contains xylitol after meals and snacks. This will help cleanse your mouth and prevent the bacteria associated with cavities from attaching to your teeth. Even better, gum will increase your saliva production and reduce bad breath!
  • Wait one hour to brush your teeth after consuming highly acidic food or drinks, like wine, coffee, citrus fruits, and soft drinks. Otherwise, you run the risk of wearing away the enamel on your teeth.

“One last reminder to patients is that they should make an appointment to see their general dentist every six months,” adds Dr. Martin. “More than 90 percent of all systemic diseases have oral manifestations, meaning that your dentist could be the first health care provider to diagnose a health problem.”

Hygiene tips for a stellar smile

  • Brush with the radio on – dentists recommend brushing for the entire length of a song.
  • Use fluoridated, antimicrobial toothpastes and mouth rinses. They help to make the tooth structure resistant to decay.
  • Keep oral hygiene products at work. Studies show that the chance of a person using them during the day will increase 65 percent.
  • Talk to your dentist about new products you’re using, as all products are not suited for all people.
  • Skip the caffeine. Avoiding caffeine before a dental appointment can make you less anxious.
  • Communicate. Use hand signals to inform the dentist that you are uncomfortable, and talk to your dentist about your specific fears.

How long do crowns last?

Crowns should last approximately five to eight years. However, with good oral hygiene and supervision, most crowns will last for a much longer period of time. Some damaging habits like grinding your teeth, chewing ice or fingernail biting may cause this period of time to decrease significantly.

What is the difference between a cap and a crown?

There is no difference between a cap and a crown.